Thai single dish meals


Thai food can be so simple.
Here are single dish meals - easy to prepare but still tasty.

Poster is from Amazing Thailand.



Central Festival - a makeover?


Central Festival was always somewhere that we visited to get some shopping and I always loved to have a cup of coffee and the best place for a Cup Cake - Joob Joob but it has now gone - it is no more.


But then it was gone - all of it! Then there was no deep fried ice-cream.


Then the Japanese Restaurant Zen had gone...


A trip to Chaing Mai


Our trip to Chiang Mai started with an early flight from Phuket and we fled on Thai Smile direct from Phuket and a quick trip and we were at Kantary Hills.



We needed lunch so we went to Guu Fusion Roti and Tea - delicious and certainly popular with the local people.



Then it was off to visit Wat Phra Singh Waramahavihan - a beautiful old temple.



Next it was Wat Chedi Luang Varavihara - tranquil, whilst the sun set, a temple where only men were allowed to enter (not something I have seen often).



Then Wat Chiang Man - a very old temple and peaceful.



Then it was time to visit the Chiang Mai Night Safari - not quite a place which I feel treats the animals with respect...



Then we went back to Guu Fusion Roti and Tea for dinnerThen we returned to Kantary Hills for a sleep. 



The next morning was wonderful - the monks arrived to give blessings and then we had breakfast.



The early start meant that we visited Mon Cham (Mon Jam) - a royal project - it was wonderful - we had a tea and scones on the top of the hill, beautiful - I could find very little information about it.



Then it was time to visit the crazy go-kart ride and then the market - a lot of fun.



Then more craziness - Pongyang Zipline and Jungle Coaster - fun but the Zipline was very busy and we had not booked.



Time for a coffee on the way back and we stopped at a scenic point called 'มอนผาโคงand had a coffee at 'Love' - a beautiful view.



We visited a temple which I do not know the name of but it was quite beautiful.




Then it time to visit the Baan Tong Luang village - where we met the Karen Long Neck hilltribe - 'Padaung'. To this day I am still a little disturbed about this to be honest...



The we drove past Wat Umong - a 700 year old Temple - this you really must visit - beautiful and perfect.



Then we needed somewhere to stay - Baan Chang Tong Hotel was our choice - a totally amazing place - a swimming pool outside our door - immaculate. We needed dinner so we walked over the river (taking the Narawat bridge) to a restaurant by the river - The Gallery.



The next morning it was up early and time to visit some temples - Wat Bupparam was the first - beautiful - maybe I should start each morning with a visit to a temple.



Then the next stop was Wat Saen Fang - วัดแสนฝาง (แสนฝัง) - another beautiful example.



Then we visited a local market - Waroros - very busy early in the morning.

Chiang Mai is certainly a wonderful place to visit.




The Paradox of our time...




The paradox of our time in history is that we have taller buildings, but shorter tempers; wider freeways, but narrower viewpoints. 

We spend more, but have less; we buy more, but enjoy it less. 

We have bigger houses and smaller families; more conveniences, but less time; 

We have more degrees, but less sense; more knowledge, but less judgment; more experts, but more problems; more medicine, but less wellness. 

We drink too much, smoke too much, spend too recklessly, laugh too little, drive too fast, get too angry too quickly, stay up too late, get up too tired, read too seldom, watch TV too much, and pray too seldom. 

We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. 

We talk too much, love too seldom, and hate too often. 

We've learned how to make a living, but not a life; we've added years to life, not life to years. 

We've been all the way to the moon and back, but have trouble crossing the street to meet the new neighbor. 

We've conquered outer space, but not inner space. 

We've done larger things, but not better things. 

We've cleaned up the air, but polluted the soul. 

We've split the atom, but not our prejudice. 

We write more, but learn less. 

We plan more, but accomplish less. 

We've learned to rush, but not to wait. 

We build more computers to hold more information to produce more copies than ever, but have less communication. 

These are the times of fast foods and slow digestion; tall men, and short character; steep profits, and shallow relationships. 

These are the times of world peace, but domestic warfare; more leisure, but less fun; more kinds of food, but less nutrition. 

These are days of two incomes, but more divorce; of fancier houses, but broken homes. 

These are days of quick trips, disposable diapers, throw-away morality, one-night stands, overweight bodies, and pills that do everything from cheer to quiet, to kill. 

It is a time when there is much in the show window and nothing in the stockroom; a time when technology can bring this letter to you, and a time when you can choose either to share this insight, or to just hit delete.

----

Very astute words - did the Dalai Lama write this? I am not sure...

The true author of the piece isn't George Carlin, Jeff Dickson, or the Dalai Lama, nor is he anonymous. Credit belongs to Dr. Bob Moorehead, former pastor of Seattle's Overlake Christian Church (who retired in 1998 after 29 years in that post).

This essay appeared under the title "The Paradox of Our Age" in Words Aptly Spoken, Dr. Moorehead's 1995 collection of prayers, homilies, and monologues used in his sermons and radio broadcasts.